Nissan Z review: the parts bin sport car – The Verge

August 8, 2022 by No Comments

It’s hard to go unnoticed in the 2023 Nissan Z, especially when optioned with the limited-run Proto Spec trim coating the vehicle in “Ikazuchi Yellow Pearl” paired with bronze Rays wheels. Its design is both striking and familiar, sharing visual cues with nearly three decades worth of Nissan sports cars. Driving a vehicle that garners that level of attention means lots of nods, thumbs-ups, and the brief conversation after parking in a public lot. The overwhelming question I received while driving the Z over Memorial Day weekend was “is that electric?”

The answer is, of course, no. The Z is powered by a 400-horsepower twin-turbo V6 — seemingly far from the Japanese automaker’s $17.6 billion push toward an electric fleet. That commitment includes producing 23 electrified (15 fully electric) vehicles by 2030 across both Nissan and Infiniti.

Electrification aside, perhaps the more interesting trait is not what’s powering the rear wheels but the Z’s form factor. Two-seat sports cars don’t exactly fly off dealership lots the same way trucks and SUVs do. That doesn’t mean they shouldn’t because the 2023 Z is a fantastic sports car.

The Z is powered by a 400-horsepower twin-turbo V6 — seemingly far from the Japanese automaker’s push toward an electric fleet

Nissan is offering two trim levels for the Z. Both feature the same engine, manual (or automatic) transmission, and rear-wheel drive-only configuration. The base Sport trim starts at $39,990, and for an additional $10,000, you can option the Performance trim — adding upgrade brakes, a mechanical limited slip differential, and a host of interior upgrades. The Proto Spec on my loaner builds off the Performance trim and adds unique wheels, yellow contrast stitching, and suede interior trim. It’s also limited to 240 units, and if you’re just learning about this model, it’s already sold out. Sorry.

The base Sport trim starts at $39,990, and for an additional $10,000, you can option the Performance trim.

Driving a vehicle that garners that level of attention means lots of nods, thumbs-ups, and the brief conversation after parking in a public lot.

As a total package, Nissan did a great job of pulling parts from its own cars.

The parts bin sports car

We have come a long way from the terrible early-2000s era of rebadging cars. You know the ones. So please understand that calling the Z a parts bin car is not an insult but, rather, a necessary move for this car to exist in the first place. Developing any vehicle is very expensive (and time-consuming). I’m not cutting Nissan slack here. There are some questionable cost-cutting measures in the Z, like hard plastic trims and nearly 20-year-old buttons. But as …….

Source: https://www.theverge.com/23287099/nissan-z-review-specs-price-sports-car

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